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  • Writer's pictureDr Henry Pops

It’s Been My Privilege – Number 1


One whiff and I’m back in 1971. The grade 11 crew of Transcona Collegiate’s Voyageur program has pulled up their canoes onto the banks of the Assiniboine River and are sitting around the evening cooking fire. Nearly 50 years later that smell still transports me.

For me, it’s the smell of 6-12 Insect Repellent. One whiff and I’m back in 1971. The grade 11 crew of Transcona Collegiate’s Voyageur program has pulled up their canoes onto the banks of the Assiniboine River and are sitting around the evening cooking fire. Nearly 50 years later that smell still transports me.


A colleague of mine sitting vigil over his father, dampened a cotton swab with coffee and presented him with a sniff. Dad woke into consciousness and was able to maintain a very close conversation.


Last Sunday I visited my mom, whose recent stroke has exacerbated an already troubling senile dementia. I picked a lilac bloom off of a hedge on the way into Deer Lodge and presented it to her. She smelled the blossom and rose out of the tangle of her confused thoughts into a few minutes of lucidity.


These three examples demonstrate how application of specific sensory stimuli can affect thought and the brain as a whole.


It’s been my privilege to study under the teaching of Dr. Ted Carrick and his team. We investigated just how various types of external stimuli (including chiropractic adjustments) affect the brain. Dr. Carrick has coined this field of study as Functional Neurology and is perhaps best known in Canada as the practitioner responsible for “rebuilding Sydney Crosbie’s brain” after his series of concussions some years ago (see McLean’s Magazine 14 November 2011).


At our office we’ve used many of Dr. Carrick’s techniques, and seen strong positive responses in neurologically injured folks.

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